“May I Have Lousy Service, Please?”

Have you ever bought a product or hired a company and said, “May I have lousy service, please? I’d like to be frustrated by the experience of doing business with you.” Doubtful.

We’ve all experienced lousy service – whether that’s due to long lines at the checkout, a botched order at a restaurant, over promises that were under delivered, or just a crummy attitude. Certainly nothing you’d ask for.

However, “good” service should be an expectation. And, depending on the product and the price, you have higher and lower definitions of “good.” For example, you do not have the same expectation at a fast food restaurant as you would a fine dining establishment. You pay more and expect more. You pay less and expect less. A real estate transaction is a pretty high priced item, so the expectation should be high.

That being said we, The Cindy Kief Team, not only pride ourselves on our service, we feel that demonstrating good service makes all the difference in the world.

For example:

Shooting a listing’s photo with a phone vs. hiring a professional photographer. Would you use your phone to shoot photos of your home when putting it on the market? Unlikely. You only have one chance to make a first impression. We make sure everyone who sees the home sees it at its best.

Marketing homes on free internet listings sites vs. conducting an actual marketing campaign for the home. We would never say, “Let’s just wait and see if someone stumbles upon your home and wants to buy it?” You could have posted your home on most of those sites yourself and stuck a sign in the yard. You didn’t need an agent to do that. Actually marketing and advertising the home for sale means, “We’re going to seek out people with the ability and likelihood to purchase your home and make sure they know it’s for sale.” A big difference!

Following up on every lead, showing, and open houses. We’re always surprised by the way some other agents respond to leads—if at all. Quite frankly, many ignore them or make a minimal effort to reach the prospective client—and then they blame the lead saying it was of low quality.  Not everyone is ready to buy immediately, but may be ready to buy sometime in the future. We keep in touch with updates on market conditions, new listings and comparable properties, so when you are ready, you know we are here.

Regular feedback to our seller client. Our seller clients have entrusted us to sell what is most likely, their largest asset—and they are paying a premium to do so.  One of the biggest complaints we hear about other agents is “we never heard from our Realtor.” We think they deserve to know how it’s going. We give them feedback on showings and leads. Let them know how we are marketing their home – and the activity and results we are generating. Make sure they are aware of new listings, price reductions and sales of properties that are competing with their home for buyers. Our goal is to make sure they know they are our partners in the process.

Be available and listen. When you have a question or concern, we try to make sure we’ve really heard it while being honest, tactful and polite. That’s what you expect and deserve. Telling you what you want to hear versus the actuality creates distrust and anxiety. If we don’t know the answer, we don’t fake it. We let you know we will find out and get back to you—and then do that. Gaining your trust will not only make this transaction go more smoothly, but will build our relationship for future business together.

Don’t make them call you. We would never want to work with a sales rep who would expect us to call him to discuss the next steps of the transaction. “Ok, well, call me on Tuesday and I should have something for you by then.” “No, I’m the customer. You call me.” Regular check-ins with you offers many opportunities and establishing a familiar relationship keeps everyone happy. What if you are concerned about something? We can turn that from a problem into a service by addressing it or fixing it.

Say “Thank you.” How many times have you checked out at a store and told the clerk, “thank you,” and they responded with “no problem” or “you’re welcome?” They are just trying to be polite, but seem to miss the point that they should be thanking me for their business — not me thanking them. “No problem,” means that I’ve inconvenienced them but they are quite ok with me doing that so that I have the privilege of buying from them.

It’s important for you to know we are appreciative of the opportunity to do business with you. By demonstrating excellent service, you will see the value and the expertise we bring to the table.

The Cindy Kief Team provides you with exceptional service every step of the way!

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